Naa Marni Niipurna

Hello Friends

Our understanding of relationships is inspired and informed by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander People’s knowledge and practice that sees all things as interrelated.

Kaurna

Kaurna Land spans from Crystal Brook in the north. Cape Jervois in the south, the Adelaide hills in the east and waters in the west. Kaurna land borders Nukunu, Ngarrindjeri, Peramangk, Narungga and Ngadjuri. The term ‘Kaurna’ likely finds 
it’s roots from the neighbouring Ramindjeri/Ngarrindjeri language, showing the closeness between Aboriginal lands.

We acknowledge the Traditional Lands of the Kaurna People and we respect and support their Spiritual, Physical, Intellectual and Emotional relationship with their Country.

We acknowledge the Traditional Lands
of the Kaurna People
and we respect and support their
Spiritual, Physical,
Intellectual and Emotional
relationship with their Country.

Our understanding of relationships is inspired and informed by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander People’s knowledge and practice that sees all things as interrelated.

PERAMANGK

Peramangk country extends from the foothills above the Adelaide Plains, north from Mount Barker through Harrogate, Gumeracha, Mount Pleasant, and Springton to the Angaston and Gawler districts in the Barossa, and south to Strathalbyn and Myponga on 
the Fleurieu Peninsula. There are also sites along the River Murray to the east where Peramangk people had access to the river. “Peramangk” is a combination of words ‘Pera’ – place on the tiered range of mount lofty and ‘Maingker’ – red ochre skin warrior.

We acknowledge the Traditional Lands of the Peramangk People
and we respect and support their Spiritual, Physical, Intellectual and Emotional relationship with their Country.

We acknowledge the Traditional Lands
of the Peramangk People
and we respect and support their
Spiritual, Physical,
Intellectual and Emotional
relationship with their Country.

Our understanding of relationships is inspired and informed by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander People’s knowledge and practice that sees all things as interrelated.

Erawirung

Erawirung refers to the Yirawirung and Jirawirung people whose lands are located on the upper reaches of the Murray River in the Berri Riverland. The Riverland also refers to areas surrounding such as: Ngaiawang, Ngawait, Nganguruku, Ngintait, Ngaralte, Ngarkat and small parts of Maraura and Daanggali.

We acknowledge the Traditional Lands of the Erawirung People and we respect and support their Spiritual, Physical, Intellectual and Emotional relationship with their Country.

We acknowledge the Traditional Lands
of the Erawirung People
and we respect and support their
Spiritual, Physical,
Intellectual and Emotional
relationship with their Country.

Our understanding of relationships is inspired and informed by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander People’s knowledge and practice that sees all things as interrelated.

BOANDIK

Boandik country is located in the Mount Gambier region. “Boandik” or “Bunganditji” means ‘People of the Reeds’.

We acknowledge the Traditional Lands of the Boandik People and we respect and support their Spiritual, Physical, Intellectual and Emotional relationship with their Country.

We acknowledge the Traditional Lands
of the Boandik People
and we respect and support their
Spiritual, Physical,
Intellectual and Emotional
relationship with their Country.

Our understanding of relationships is inspired and informed by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander People’s knowledge and practice that sees all things as interrelated.

kurdnatta

Kurdnatta country is located in the Port Augusta region. This area also includes the lands of the Barngarla and Nukunu people. “Kurdnatta” means ‘Place of Drifting Sand’.

We acknowledge the Traditional Lands of the Kurdnatta People and we respect and support their Spiritual, Physical, Intellectual and Emotional relationship with their Country.

We acknowledge the Traditional Lands
of the Kurdnatta People
and we respect and support their
Spiritual, Physical,
Intellectual and Emotional
relationship with their Country.

Next
Next

We come together as RASA, a not-for-profit organisation that exists on the lands of Kaurna . Tarntanya . Kuntu . Yartapuulti . Warraparinga . Para Wirra . Peramangk . Erawirung . Boandik . Kurdnatta .

RASA recognises the world’s oldest continuous living culture. For more than 65,000 years the original custodians welcomed all people to their Lands. They taught us responsibility, reciprocity and connections to these lands, knowing we are all visitors to these places that we live, work, and enjoy.

We acknowledge the importance of knowing these countries, to recognise the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, their Elders, their communities, their stories. When we learn about Country we recognise the care for the lands, skies, waters, plants, and animals that has always been a part of Aboriginal cultures.

We come together as RASA,
a not-for-profit organisation that
exists on the lands of
Kaurna . Tarntanya . Kuntu .
Yartapuulti . Warraparinga .
Para Wirra . Peramangk . Erawirung .
Boandik . Kurdnatta .

RASA recognises the world’s oldest
continuous living culture. For more
than 65,000 years the original
custodians welcomed all people to
their Lands. They taught us
responsibility, reciprocity and
connections to these lands,
knowing we are all visitors to these
places that we live, work, and enjoy.

We acknowledge the importance of
knowing these countries, to recognise
the Aboriginal and Torres Strait
Islander people, their Elders,
their communities, their stories.
When we learn about Country we
recognise the care for the lands,
skies, waters, plants, and animals
that has always been a part of
Aboriginal cultures.

We are conscious of our privilege to be here, doing the work that we do.
We understand that this privilege comes from the ongoing violation of these
lands which continues to harm Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people's

relationships, health, wellbeing and aspirations.

RASA embraces the opportunity to learn from the knowledge and wisdom of First Nations peoples. The knowledge and wisdom we absorb inspires us to work restoratively,
with open-mindedness and holistically, to foster meaningful change in future lives.

We believe that walking in harmony depends on our ability as an organisation to listen, appreciate, collaborate, learn, and speak up.

We are conscious of our privilege to
be here, doing the work that we do.
We understand that this privilege
comes from the ongoing violation
of these lands which continues to
harm Aboriginal and Torres Strait
Islander people's relationships,
health, wellbeing and aspirations.

RASA embraces the opportunity to
learn from the knowledge and
wisdom of First Nations peoples.
The knowledge and wisdom we
absorb inspires us to work
restoratively, with open-mindedness
and holistically, to foster meaningful
change in future lives.

We believe that walking in harmony
depends on our ability as an
organisation to listen, appreciate,
collaborate, learn, and speak up.

This is, was and always will be, Aboriginal land, water and songlines.

This is, was and always will be,
Aboriginal land, water and songlines.

Overview

Who It's For

Family Group Conferencing involves families who have been referred by the Department of Child Protection. We work with parents, children, extended family and any other relevant person in the family circle.

How We Help

Independent coordination and facilitation of Family Group Conferences that enable families to come together to make informed decisions about their children and young people.

What to Expect

Family Group Conferencing is offered as in-person, group family sessions. Followed by private family time and space to make decisions as a family.

How we help:

01
Family-led decision-making
02
Child safety and well-being
03
Restorative practices
04
Connection and pride in culture
05
Putting children at the centre
A collection of shells on the sand.

We place children at the centre.

A circle is protection and safety whose boundary helps encourage sharing and confidentiality. Circle work allows us to sit in story to connect the act of Dadirri deep listening.

For the Children

Ngartuitya (nar too it yah) is a Kaurna concept from the traditional owners of the Adelaide Plains region meaning ‘for the Children’. This concept values and spotlights children and reorients the focus to be for them, not without them.

A cropped image of a childs hand holding two adult hands.

Ngartuitya Family Group Conference team recognises the protective factors that cultural identity provides.  All families from diverse cultural backgrounds will be provided, wherever possible, an appropriate Ngartuitya Coordinator whose role includes ensuring that the processes of the conference support the family’s cultural identity and encourages pride in culture.

It is of critical importance to reduce the over-representation of Aboriginal children and young people in the child protection system and Ngartuitya Family Group Conference Service will provide Aboriginal Coordinators wherever possible and appropriate, to ensure services are culturally inclusive, safe and respectful to Aboriginal families living in South Australia.

Families also have the right to choose a cultural representative to attend their Family Group Conference. 

What is Family Group Conferencing?

Family Group Conferencing provides an opportunity for a child or young person and their family to make informed decisions about their own arrangements for the care and protection of the child or young person, and to make voluntary arrangements for their care that are consistent with the priorities outlined in Chapter 2 of the Children and Young Person (Safety) Act 2017  (CYPS Act).  Family Group Conferencing can also be convened to review arrangements and decisions made at a previous conference.

Family Group Conferencing is underpinned by the principles of family led decision making which recognises that:

  • Families are experts in their own lives.
  • Family involved in a Group Conference broadly includes the children, parents extended family and even significant friends and neighbours to the family who may not actually be blood related. Families have the right to have a cultural representative present at their conference.
  • Families, including extended family and communities, have a pivotal role in the care and protection of children and young people
  • Empowering families to make informed decisions about what’s best for their children and young people, benefits children and young people, families and communities
  • Better outcomes are achieved for children when families and children themselves are involved in decision-making processes, when safe to do so
  • Children and young people’s connection to their family and culture is crucial to their wellbeing and development.

How does Family Group Conferencing work?

  • For families to participate in an Ngartuitya Family Group Conference they must be fully informed by a Department for Child Protection (DCP) social worker about the safety concerns for the child and agree that to minimise or remove those risks for the child to thrive, that a whole of family approach could work.
  • A DCP social worker will explain the purpose Family Group Conferencing to the family, including who is able to attend the conference. Participation in a Family Group Conference is voluntary.
  • Once the family agrees to participate, they are referred to Ngartuitya Family Group Conference Service at Relationships Australia South Australia who will connect with the family to discuss the referral and prepare for the conference. This includes the allocation of a Ngartuitya Coordinator to support members of the family come together for the benefit of the child.
  • The preparation stage is a critical stage as the Ngartuitya Coordinator works closely with the family to ensure all the people who can positively contribute the care of the child are invited to participate in the conference.
  • The Ngartuitya Coordinator, in partnership with the child or young person and their parent, is responsible for deciding who can attend a Family Group Conference.  This decision is based on whether the participation of a person is likely to make a useful contribution to reaching an agreement that supports the wellbeing of the child during the Family Group Conference.
  • The Ngartuitya Coordinator is in attendance as they facilitate the smooth running of the family conference. The DCP social worker will be in attendance too.
  • The Family Agreement will need to address the concerns raised by the Department of Child Protection. The Family Agreement must be agreed to by the parents/guardians, child or young person (if in attendance) and the DCP social worker at the time of the conference.
  • It is the Ngartuitya Coordinator’s role to provide a written record of all decisions made at the Family Group Conference. This can include decisions about care arrangements, cultural support and connections, contact arrangements as well as any actions required by parents/guardians, other agencies and family members.

Ngartuitya Family Group Conferencing team are eager to hear your feedback and each participant will be contacted about their experience to help us understand what is working well and what to do better.

For families to participate in an Ngartuitya Family Group Conference (NFGC) they must be fully informed by a Department for Child Protection (DCP) social worker about the safety concerns for the child and agree that to minimise or remove those risks for the child to thrive,  a whole of family approach could work.

Families’ participation in a Family Group Conference is voluntary.

Once the family agrees to participate, they are referred to Ngartuitya Family Group Conference Service at Relationships Australia South Australia who will connect with the family to discuss preparation for the conference. This includes the allocation of a Ngartuitya Coordinator to support members of the family come together for the benefit of the child.

Once the child, parents and all family members have understood the purpose and agree to participate in an NFGC, the Ngartuitya Coordinator will organise a suitable venue and time so that the family can come together to discuss how, as a family, they will work together to support the child.

On the day of the Family Group Conference, the Ngartuitya Coordinator will be present at the venue and family members will attend. Either this can be in person, via video or telephone link or the Ngartuitya Coordinator can provide written contributions from those who cannot attend. The space will be set up to be welcoming and facilitate shared discussion.

  1. Introduction to the Ngartuitya Family Group Conference – The first part is sitting together as a family so the Ngartuitya Coordinator can ensure that everyone present, including the DCP  social worker, is aware of the purpose, each person’s role and responsibility and that the child’s safety concerns to be addressed, are clear to everyone present.
  2. Family time – This is private time and space for the family to make decisions on what solutions they can provide within their own family and community to address concerns raised. The Ngartuitya Coordinator can provide facilitation assistance if requested by the family. The DCP social worker is not part of the family time
  3. Family Agreement (the plan) – The Family Agreement has to say what needs to be done, by who, and when these actions need to be taken to address the safety and wellbeing concerns for the child or young person. All participants, including the DCP social worker – who is required to approve the Family Agreement, must agree to the decisions made, understand their own role and their responsibilities within the timeframes agreed on at the conference. The Ngartuitya Coordinator will ensure that all present receive a copy of the family agreement.

Families will be followed up by the Ngartuitya Coordinator and the DCP social worker within 3 months to see how the Family Agreement is working and to assist with any adjustments. The Ngartuitya Coordinator will check in with the family and may arrange for the family meet again and participate in another conference.

The family is able to request a review if two or more family members who participated in the Family Group Conference believe it is required.

Family involved in a Group Conference will include children, parents, extended family and even significant friends and neighbours to the family (who may not actually be blood related) and can include a cultural representative.

Families, including extended family and communities, have an important role in caring for children and young people, and keeping them safe.

I
N
F
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Funding Acknowledgement

Ngartyuitya Family Group Conferencing is funded by the South Australian Department for Child Protection. 

Fees
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