Naa Marni Niipurna

Hello Friends

Our understanding of relationships is inspired and informed by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander People’s knowledge and practice that sees all things as interrelated.

Kaurna

Kaurna Land spans from Crystal Brook in the north. Cape Jervois in the south, the Adelaide hills in the east and waters in the west. Kaurna land borders Nukunu, Ngarrindjeri, Peramangk, Narungga and Ngadjuri. The term ‘Kaurna’ likely finds 
it’s roots from the neighbouring Ramindjeri/Ngarrindjeri language, showing the closeness between Aboriginal lands.

We acknowledge the Traditional Lands of the Kaurna People and we respect and support their Spiritual, Physical, Intellectual and Emotional relationship with their Country.

We acknowledge the Traditional Lands
of the Kaurna People
and we respect and support their
Spiritual, Physical,
Intellectual and Emotional
relationship with their Country.

Our understanding of relationships is inspired and informed by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander People’s knowledge and practice that sees all things as interrelated.

PERAMANGK

Peramangk country extends from the foothills above the Adelaide Plains, north from Mount Barker through Harrogate, Gumeracha, Mount Pleasant, and Springton to the Angaston and Gawler districts in the Barossa, and south to Strathalbyn and Myponga on 
the Fleurieu Peninsula. There are also sites along the River Murray to the east where Peramangk people had access to the river. “Peramangk” is a combination of words ‘Pera’ – place on the tiered range of mount lofty and ‘Maingker’ – red ochre skin warrior.

We acknowledge the Traditional Lands of the Peramangk People
and we respect and support their Spiritual, Physical, Intellectual and Emotional relationship with their Country.

We acknowledge the Traditional Lands
of the Peramangk People
and we respect and support their
Spiritual, Physical,
Intellectual and Emotional
relationship with their Country.

Our understanding of relationships is inspired and informed by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander People’s knowledge and practice that sees all things as interrelated.

Erawirung

Erawirung refers to the Yirawirung and Jirawirung people whose lands are located on the upper reaches of the Murray River in the Berri Riverland. The Riverland also refers to areas surrounding such as: Ngaiawang, Ngawait, Nganguruku, Ngintait, Ngaralte, Ngarkat and small parts of Maraura and Daanggali.

We acknowledge the Traditional Lands of the Erawirung People and we respect and support their Spiritual, Physical, Intellectual and Emotional relationship with their Country.

We acknowledge the Traditional Lands
of the Erawirung People
and we respect and support their
Spiritual, Physical,
Intellectual and Emotional
relationship with their Country.

Our understanding of relationships is inspired and informed by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander People’s knowledge and practice that sees all things as interrelated.

BOANDIK

Boandik country is located in the Mount Gambier region. “Boandik” or “Bunganditji” means ‘People of the Reeds’.

We acknowledge the Traditional Lands of the Boandik People and we respect and support their Spiritual, Physical, Intellectual and Emotional relationship with their Country.

We acknowledge the Traditional Lands
of the Boandik People
and we respect and support their
Spiritual, Physical,
Intellectual and Emotional
relationship with their Country.

Our understanding of relationships is inspired and informed by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander People’s knowledge and practice that sees all things as interrelated.

kurdnatta

Kurdnatta country is located in the Port Augusta region. This area also includes the lands of the Barngarla and Nukunu people. “Kurdnatta” means ‘Place of Drifting Sand’.

We acknowledge the Traditional Lands of the Kurdnatta People and we respect and support their Spiritual, Physical, Intellectual and Emotional relationship with their Country.

We acknowledge the Traditional Lands
of the Kurdnatta People
and we respect and support their
Spiritual, Physical,
Intellectual and Emotional
relationship with their Country.

Next
Next

We come together as RASA, a not-for-profit organisation that exists on the lands of Kaurna . Tarntanya . Kuntu . Yartapuulti . Warraparinga . Para Wirra . Peramangk . Erawirung . Boandik . Kurdnatta .

RASA recognises the world’s oldest continuous living culture. For more than 65,000 years the original custodians welcomed all people to their Lands. They taught us responsibility, reciprocity and connections to these lands, knowing we are all visitors to these places that we live, work, and enjoy.

We acknowledge the importance of knowing these countries, to recognise the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, their Elders, their communities, their stories. When we learn about Country we recognise the care for the lands, skies, waters, plants, and animals that has always been a part of Aboriginal cultures.

We come together as RASA,
a not-for-profit organisation that
exists on the lands of
Kaurna . Tarntanya . Kuntu .
Yartapuulti . Warraparinga .
Para Wirra . Peramangk . Erawirung .
Boandik . Kurdnatta .

RASA recognises the world’s oldest
continuous living culture. For more
than 65,000 years the original
custodians welcomed all people to
their Lands. They taught us
responsibility, reciprocity and
connections to these lands,
knowing we are all visitors to these
places that we live, work, and enjoy.

We acknowledge the importance of
knowing these countries, to recognise
the Aboriginal and Torres Strait
Islander people, their Elders,
their communities, their stories.
When we learn about Country we
recognise the care for the lands,
skies, waters, plants, and animals
that has always been a part of
Aboriginal cultures.

We are conscious of our privilege to be here, doing the work that we do.
We understand that this privilege comes from the ongoing violation of these
lands which continues to harm Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people's

relationships, health, wellbeing and aspirations.

RASA embraces the opportunity to learn from the knowledge and wisdom of First Nations peoples. The knowledge and wisdom we absorb inspires us to work restoratively,
with open-mindedness and holistically, to foster meaningful change in future lives.

We believe that walking in harmony depends on our ability as an organisation to listen, appreciate, collaborate, learn, and speak up.

We are conscious of our privilege to
be here, doing the work that we do.
We understand that this privilege
comes from the ongoing violation
of these lands which continues to
harm Aboriginal and Torres Strait
Islander people's relationships,
health, wellbeing and aspirations.

RASA embraces the opportunity to
learn from the knowledge and
wisdom of First Nations peoples.
The knowledge and wisdom we
absorb inspires us to work
restoratively, with open-mindedness
and holistically, to foster meaningful
change in future lives.

We believe that walking in harmony
depends on our ability as an
organisation to listen, appreciate,
collaborate, learn, and speak up.

This is, was and always will be, Aboriginal land, water and songlines.

This is, was and always will be,
Aboriginal land, water and songlines.

FAQs

FAQs

Answers to your most asked questions.

Contents

Chronic Illness

Chronic Illness Chronic illnesses are long-term conditions characterized by complex causes; multiple risks; long periods of latency (the time between exposure to the illness and feeling its affects); and impairment or disability. Common chronic physical illnesses include coronary heart disease, stroke, lung cancer, colorectal cancer, diabetes, arthritis, osteoporosis, asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, chronic kidney disease, hepatitis C, and oral diseases (State Government Victoria, 2012). Long-term mental health illnesses are also considered chronic illnesses, and include depression, schizophrenia and bipolar disorder (Gray, 2015). Chronic Pain Pain is defined as an unpleasant sensory and emotional experience associated with actual or potential tissue damage or experienced in terms of such damage (Merskey & Bogduk, 1994). Chronic pain refers to pain that has persisted for a period longer than three months (Merskey & Bogduk, 1994). This form of pain is now considered to be a disease in its own right (Tracey & Bushnell, 2009), rather than just being a symptom of some other condition, as it is often experienced for many months or years despite attempts to treat it with medications and other therapies (Gray, 2015).

Intercountry Adoptee and Family Support Service

We can provide you with support if you have been contacted via DNA testing. Please call us to make an appointment.  
Yes we can provide you with emotional support to go through this process, however you will also need some legal representative or you can represent yourself in court, as all discharges need to go through the South Australian Children’s Court.  
Yes we do. Please contact us for more information.
You will need written consent from your parent in order for you to access the adoption file for searching. If your parent has passed away, you are able to access the information as a descendant of an adoptee. 
The first thing you will need to do is to get the adoption file. You can do this by following this link:  https://www.childprotection.sa.gov.au/adoption/provision-of-adoption-information 
We have an information booklet available here. We can also visit the school to discuss how best to support an adopted young person in the school.
Up to $500 per application is available.
The total amount per financial year is $50,000, which includes the bursaries component, with each grant being a maximum of up to $5000. There are two grant rounds per year.
The first thing you will need to do is to get the adoption file. Once you have the file, we can assist you with your search.

Together4Kids

Contact us and ask to talk to a Family Advisor to discuss the most appropriate service for you and your child.
No, children must be clients of a homelessness or family violence service and referred by a family case manager.

Supporting Emotional Wellness in Aged Care

The program is not intended to support residents with significant behavioural issues, dementia with severe cognitive features and behavioural symptoms which is affecting their wellbeing and care, or delirium. These needs are better supported by specialised services, such as the South Australian Government’s Older Persons Mental Health Service and the Dementia Behaviour Management Advisory Service, delivered through Hammond Care Australia.
 The program will not duplicate the role of leisure and recreation activities already provided to facility residents.
We welcome self-referrals, as well as referrals from family and friends. Call 1800 000 739 between 9am and 5pm, Monday to Friday.

GOM Central

GOM Central is part of Relationships Australia and is not run by the Department for Child Protection.
Yes, we have plenty of social activities you can join!
Other young people with lived experience of the care system, as well as some post care workers.
Visit our website, send us an email or reach out to 0415 078 733.
We’re an online support resource for young care leavers. Watch this short video to find out more.
Our focus groups are safe places for young people. We’d love you to share and participate when you feel comfortable. However, you can do this at your own pace. We’ll never pressure you to share your story in order to participate.

Reset2Respect

Referrals for this program must come through the Courts  Administration Authority.

About Culture

In some cases, this may be the outcome, but in some cases no, just make sure you remember that whatever the case, it is something that can always be worked on! There are many cases where things turn out better than anyone ever hoped. UNIDOS will always provide support to help you through these hard times and there will be people for you to talk to you.
You do not have to make a choice between your cultural values and beliefs or being same sex attracted, it is quite possible that you can embrace both equally in your life. Being same sex attracted is only one part of your identity and you do not have to take it on as being all of who you are. Sometimes it is hard to find a balance, especially when there are parts of your culture that do not agree or conflict with being same sex attracted; but with time and support, it is something that can be achievable.
It is sometimes easier for them because in Australian culture, same sex attraction is more openly spoken about, there are many laws that protect their rights and safety and there is a lot more exposure, education and awareness than in many other cultures. It is quite common for there to be conflict of values and beliefs across different cultures, which can make being same sex attracted harder in one culture than it is in another.
It can be, because often our families and communities were brought up differently, and in many countries being same sex attracted is thought to be wrong. There is also the case of sexuality not being something that’s openly discussed in our parent’s earlier years, so they don’t actually know a lot about it!

About Sexuality

At first it can feel like you are all alone, but this does not have to remain that way because there are definitely more people who share the same feelings out there. There are many same sex friendly services out there, which will not judge or disclose any information you do not want shared. It can be scary to reach out to these places and you may not feel like they’d understand your individual needs (based on our cultural differences) so that’s why UNIDOS has to come together as a support group for same sex attracted people from different cultural backgrounds.
No, they will not – each situation is different, everyone has their own unique experience. There are some similarities in the way loved ones react based on culture, beliefs, religions, experiences and expectations. This is why we all need to find a way to accept that this is how we are and to learn to be happy with it, even though some people close to us may not feel that way initially. As we learn to accept ourselves, we can then teach our communities to do the same.
Absolutely not, you do not have to come out and you should never be forced to do so either. It’s something you do when and only when you are completely ready. It may be something that you choose to never do and that’s ok too! There are often lots of pressures for same sex attracted people to come out, but you should never feel forced to do it if it makes you uncomfortable or will cause you too much hardship. However, if you do decide to come out, a few things to remember about this whole process is that you have the right to live the life you want to live, and share your life publicly with the person you love. Sometimes this is difficult and it could risk you losing the people you love and be judged by your community, but it can sometimes turn out better than you think. Someone out there does understand your situation, and closing some doors may open a whole bunch of new ones.
Coming out is when you decide to reveal that you are same sex attracted, and this is done once you decide you’re ready. Coming out definitely has its advantages, it is a time when you are ready to live the life you want to live, and when you’re ready to publicly share your relationship and who you are. But it can also cause hurt and hardship for the individual coming out, especially when you belong to a strong cultural group or strict family who are non-accepting.
No! Despite what your family and communities might think – there is nothing wrong with being same sex attracted and you are not sick or mentally ill! What is sick is hurting people, abusing them, stuff like that. Having real feelings for someone is not. That is called attraction, lust or even love, which is not wrong, or sick, its part of life and is completely natural.
Bisexuality is when you are sexually attracted to both males and females. It is completely possible for some people to love and be attracted to a person for who they are, rather than just their gender. We have to keep an open mind, and respect everyone, even if they do not choose to live their life the way we think they should. Everyone has their own individual experiences and feelings and we should all learn to accept them in the same way we want to be accepted.
You can certainly pretend not to have these feelings; you can also choose to hide it from your friends and family. You do not have to feel any pressure to admit to share anything with yourself or others if you are not ready. Just remember that we are not always fixed people, life is fluid, we can all change and grow to feel attracted to many different people, and sometimes they may be from the same sex or a different one.
It is said that being same sex attracted is something we choose and something we realise about ourselves in our adolescent years. In some cases it may be something you are born with and have always known, or perhaps don’t realise until much later in life. Whatever the case, we can’t generalise. In some ways there is a choice, the choice lies in whether you want to act on your attractions or not. There is often not a choice to switch off the feelings and attractions you may be feeling for the same sex.
There are many theories on what causes us to have these feelings, for example: people can sometimes think that it’s only because someone else in your family is same-sex attracted, or that it’s the influence of your friends. Others may say that it’s because you’ve had bad experiences with the opposite sex, or because of social and media influences, but when it comes down to it, all you have to remember is that your feelings are yours, and you feel them because they are natural to you. There is nothing wrong with it, and you can absolutely live a normal life, feel the deepest love and be a productive member of society.
Sometimes it’s not easy to tell if you are same sex attracted, especially when you come from a cultural background where it is never spoken about openly or recognised. Being same sex attracted though, generally means that you have feelings and a sexual attraction that extends beyond friendship, for someone who is the same sex as you. If you feel this way then it could be an indication that you are same sex attracted.
It means just that! It means that you have intimate feelings and a sexual attraction for someone who is the same sex as you.

Child Sexual Abuse Counselling Service

If you have legal questions or concerns about telling your story to the Royal Commission, you should contact knowmore, a free legal advisory service for people who would like legal advice either before, or at any point after, contacting the Royal Commission.

knowmore is a confidential, free legal advice service to help people navigate the Royal Commission.  knowmore has been established by the National Association of Community Legal Centres Inc with funding from the Australian Government. It is completely separate from the Royal Commission. It offers a free national advice line and where possible will see people in person as needed. It can help with:
  • Legal information and advice about the Royal Commission’s powers, procedures and guidelines and the range of options available for engaging with the Royal Commission
  • Advice on related legal issues such as the effect of confidentiality agreements in past proceedings and the availability of compensation
  • Help with writing statements and submissions
knowmore does not provide legal representation for people appearing before the Royal Commission but, if needed, can help you with finding suitable representation and to access funding for it. knowmore’s staff includes lawyers, counsellors, social workers and Aboriginal liaison officers. knowmore’s national free advice line is 1800 605 762. Further information about the services knowmore provides can be found at: www.knowmore.org.au
Royal Commission Support Services is only for people affected by childhood sexual abuse that occurred in institutions. However, if the abuse did not occur in an institution, we can refer you to other counselling and support services.
Yes. Royal Commission Support Services can provide counselling and support to anyone affected by the Royal Commission, including individuals, family members and friends, as well as employees of institutions where abuse occurred. You do not need to engage with the Royal Commission in order to access these services.
The Government understands the painful and traumatic nature of remembering stories of childhood sexual abuse and as a result has funded free support services in all states. Royal Commission Support Services is a free service provided by Relationships Australia (SA). This service is for people affected by the Royal Commission, family members and friends, as well as employees at institutions where abuse occurred. We can help you to:
  • Understand the Royal Commission process
  • Tell your story to the Royal Commission
  • Access counselling and legal support
We can support anyone affected by the Royal Commission, even if you do not want to officially share your story.
The Royal Commission does not have the power to make grants of compensation to individuals affected by institutional child sexual abuse. The Royal Commission can make recommendations about alleviating the impact of past child sexual abuse, but they cannot grant compensation.
Not directly. The Royal Commission can provide your information to law enforcement bodies however the information you provide will be kept confidential unless you agree to it being made public. The Royal Commission can communicate information provided to it to law enforcement bodies. This could include information you provide in private sessions. The Royal Commission will ask you to agree to information you have provided being given to law enforcement bodies. The Royal Commission will only disclose information you provide to a law enforcement agency, without first discussing the matter with you, if the Chair of the Royal Commission believes that is necessary to prevent harm to any person.
If you contact the Royal Commission but the Royal Commission determines that your situation is outside the Terms of Reference, they will discuss this with you and, where necessary, discuss what other options are available to you. Where appropriate, they will offer you the contact details of law enforcement agencies, support services and other agencies and provide assistance in contacting these agencies.
The word ‘institution’ in this context refers to any public or private body, association, club or organisation that has provided activities, facilities, programs or services for children, excluding courts. This includes government and non-government facilities, including state homes, orphanages, churches and sporting clubs.
The Royal Commission into Institutional Responses to Child Sexual Abuse is a six-member panel that is investigating how institutions have responded to allegations and instances of child sexual abuse. The panel was appointed on 11 January 2013 by the Governor-General of the Commonwealth of Australia: Her Excellency Quentin Bryce. It is the job of the Royal Commission to uncover where systems have failed to protect children so it can make recommendations on how to improve laws, policies and practices.
Self-referrals can be made by calling 1800 408 408 or using the online referral form. Services referring to CSACS are asked to utilise the online referral form.
 The counselling provided is directly related to the sexual trauma. The service is eligible for people who’ve experienced historical sexual abuse, have an active or no present investigation, and in a familial or institutional context.
The service is short to mid-term in nature however frequency and duration of services is variable depending on individual circumstances.

Counselling

No. Any feedback to parents will be provided with the consent of the child/young person, either in-person or via a phone call.
If you are currently addressing matters through Family Court, we may need to postpone services until Family Court matters are concluded.

Family Dispute Resolution (Mediation)

No. Any feedback to parents will be provided with the consent of the child/young person, either in-person or via a phone call.
If you are currently addressing matters through Family Court, we may need to postpone services until Family Court matters are concluded.
Each child can access up to six sessions. Additional appointments may be offered if appropriate. We can also refer children to other support services once they have concluded with iKiDs.
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