Naa Marni Niipurna

Hello Friends

Our understanding of relationships is inspired and informed by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander People’s knowledge and practice that sees all things as interrelated.

Kaurna

Kaurna Land spans from Crystal Brook in the north. Cape Jervois in the south, the Adelaide hills in the east and waters in the west. Kaurna land borders Nukunu, Ngarrindjeri, Peramangk, Narungga and Ngadjuri. The term ‘Kaurna’ likely finds 
it’s roots from the neighbouring Ramindjeri/Ngarrindjeri language, showing the closeness between Aboriginal lands.

We acknowledge the Traditional Lands of the Kaurna People and we respect and support their Spiritual, Physical, Intellectual and Emotional relationship with their Country.

We acknowledge the Traditional Lands
of the Kaurna People
and we respect and support their
Spiritual, Physical,
Intellectual and Emotional
relationship with their Country.

Our understanding of relationships is inspired and informed by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander People’s knowledge and practice that sees all things as interrelated.

PERAMANGK

Peramangk country extends from the foothills above the Adelaide Plains, north from Mount Barker through Harrogate, Gumeracha, Mount Pleasant, and Springton to the Angaston and Gawler districts in the Barossa, and south to Strathalbyn and Myponga on 
the Fleurieu Peninsula. There are also sites along the River Murray to the east where Peramangk people had access to the river. “Peramangk” is a combination of words ‘Pera’ – place on the tiered range of mount lofty and ‘Maingker’ – red ochre skin warrior.

We acknowledge the Traditional Lands of the Peramangk People
and we respect and support their Spiritual, Physical, Intellectual and Emotional relationship with their Country.

We acknowledge the Traditional Lands
of the Peramangk People
and we respect and support their
Spiritual, Physical,
Intellectual and Emotional
relationship with their Country.

Our understanding of relationships is inspired and informed by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander People’s knowledge and practice that sees all things as interrelated.

Erawirung

Erawirung refers to the Yirawirung and Jirawirung people whose lands are located on the upper reaches of the Murray River in the Berri Riverland. The Riverland also refers to areas surrounding such as: Ngaiawang, Ngawait, Nganguruku, Ngintait, Ngaralte, Ngarkat and small parts of Maraura and Daanggali.

We acknowledge the Traditional Lands of the Erawirung People and we respect and support their Spiritual, Physical, Intellectual and Emotional relationship with their Country.

We acknowledge the Traditional Lands
of the Erawirung People
and we respect and support their
Spiritual, Physical,
Intellectual and Emotional
relationship with their Country.

Our understanding of relationships is inspired and informed by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander People’s knowledge and practice that sees all things as interrelated.

BOANDIK

Boandik country is located in the Mount Gambier region. “Boandik” or “Bunganditji” means ‘People of the Reeds’.

We acknowledge the Traditional Lands of the Boandik People and we respect and support their Spiritual, Physical, Intellectual and Emotional relationship with their Country.

We acknowledge the Traditional Lands
of the Boandik People
and we respect and support their
Spiritual, Physical,
Intellectual and Emotional
relationship with their Country.

Our understanding of relationships is inspired and informed by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander People’s knowledge and practice that sees all things as interrelated.

kurdnatta

Kurdnatta country is located in the Port Augusta region. This area also includes the lands of the Barngarla and Nukunu people. “Kurdnatta” means ‘Place of Drifting Sand’.

We acknowledge the Traditional Lands of the Kurdnatta People and we respect and support their Spiritual, Physical, Intellectual and Emotional relationship with their Country.

We acknowledge the Traditional Lands
of the Kurdnatta People
and we respect and support their
Spiritual, Physical,
Intellectual and Emotional
relationship with their Country.

Next
Next

We come together as RASA, a not-for-profit organisation that exists on the lands of Kaurna . Tarntanya . Kuntu . Yartapuulti . Warraparinga . Para Wirra . Peramangk . Erawirung . Boandik . Kurdnatta .

RASA recognises the world’s oldest continuous living culture. For more than 65,000 years the original custodians welcomed all people to their Lands. They taught us responsibility, reciprocity and connections to these lands, knowing we are all visitors to these places that we live, work, and enjoy.

We acknowledge the importance of knowing these countries, to recognise the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, their Elders, their communities, their stories. When we learn about Country we recognise the care for the lands, skies, waters, plants, and animals that has always been a part of Aboriginal cultures.

We come together as RASA,
a not-for-profit organisation that
exists on the lands of
Kaurna . Tarntanya . Kuntu .
Yartapuulti . Warraparinga .
Para Wirra . Peramangk . Erawirung .
Boandik . Kurdnatta .

RASA recognises the world’s oldest
continuous living culture. For more
than 65,000 years the original
custodians welcomed all people to
their Lands. They taught us
responsibility, reciprocity and
connections to these lands,
knowing we are all visitors to these
places that we live, work, and enjoy.

We acknowledge the importance of
knowing these countries, to recognise
the Aboriginal and Torres Strait
Islander people, their Elders,
their communities, their stories.
When we learn about Country we
recognise the care for the lands,
skies, waters, plants, and animals
that has always been a part of
Aboriginal cultures.

We are conscious of our privilege to be here, doing the work that we do.
We understand that this privilege comes from the ongoing violation of these
lands which continues to harm Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people's

relationships, health, wellbeing and aspirations.

RASA embraces the opportunity to learn from the knowledge and wisdom of First Nations peoples. The knowledge and wisdom we absorb inspires us to work restoratively,
with open-mindedness and holistically, to foster meaningful change in future lives.

We believe that walking in harmony depends on our ability as an organisation to listen, appreciate, collaborate, learn, and speak up.

We are conscious of our privilege to
be here, doing the work that we do.
We understand that this privilege
comes from the ongoing violation
of these lands which continues to
harm Aboriginal and Torres Strait
Islander people's relationships,
health, wellbeing and aspirations.

RASA embraces the opportunity to
learn from the knowledge and
wisdom of First Nations peoples.
The knowledge and wisdom we
absorb inspires us to work
restoratively, with open-mindedness
and holistically, to foster meaningful
change in future lives.

We believe that walking in harmony
depends on our ability as an
organisation to listen, appreciate,
collaborate, learn, and speak up.

This is, was and always will be, Aboriginal land, water and songlines.

This is, was and always will be,
Aboriginal land, water and songlines.

Overview

Who It's For

SCILS works with high school students experiencing complex barriers to their learning and well-being, increasing their risk of dropping out without pursuing further education or employment.

How We Help

SCILS provide students with support in case management, SCILS Learning Hubs and/or supported referrals into other programs and accredited courses in line with students’ interests and readiness.

What to Expect

One on one support, group activities and school-based programs to assist young people to gain independence and positive wellbeing outcomes. SCILS programs are therapeutic and offer unique opportunities.

Program

SCILS workers meet with young people weekly to develop a plan for the year ahead, set goals and explore options for learning and wellbeing.

Price

Please contact us for pricing details at SCILS@rasa.org.au

Delivery Options

SCILS staff meet weekly with the young person in an environment that feels safe and comfortable for them. We have flexible options when working with young people, meaning we can adapt delivery to the young person's specific needs or goals.

The SCILS team

We understand that family complexities, developmental or learning differences, traumatic events or mental health challenges can create additional barriers to traditional learning and employment pathways. 

Our multidisciplinary team have interest in therapeutic and engaging activities such as music, drama, outdoor adventure sports, team sports, gaming and more.

We have skills and experience in: 

Youth Work
Counselling
Psychology
Case Management
Social Work
Developmental Education

Government Program Approval

Relationships Australia South Australia are on the Approved Panel of Providers with the Government of South Australia Department for Education to provide the Flexible learning options (FLO) Program. FLO supports young people who have or are at risk of disengaging from school and may be experiencing other challenges, such as anxiety and depression, bullying, unstable accommodation, family difficulties, or pregnancy or parenting.

Three young people talking to each other on the street.

Case Management

We work restoratively and flexibly with each young person, with a focus on strengths-based and person-centred practice approaches. We meet weekly, exploring and helping build students’ strengths, skills and capabilities to support them to reach their goals, and ultimately flourish and thrive in their learning and in their families and communities.

Wellbeing

Our personal wellbeing is interconnected to other aspects of our life. If our wellbeing is low then it is very difficult for us to take advantage of life’s opportunities. SCILS encourages all young people to embrace a wellbeing challenge.

Young person looking at their phone.
Young girl putting bread in oven.

Independent Living Skills

Many parents feel concerned about their young person’s ‘world-ready’ skills. We work with young people to develop a living skills plan that strategically moves young people towards an independent future.

Employability Skills

Thinking about employment can be anxiety provoking for many young people and those supporting them. SCILS offers unique and flexible opportunities for students to gain employability skills. 

Young person working in a cafe.
Young people studying together.

Education Programs

SCILS employ a registered teacher who ensures learning is appropriately mapped, student’s learning needs are understood and fulfilled, and that student work is marked and resulted. Our teacher works to develop innovative and targeted Learning and Assessment Plans (LAPs) to maximise learning involvement and learning outcomes/outputs.

Experiential Learning

SCILS offers a range of experiential learning experiences:

  • Aqua Fitness at the Aquadome
  • Ice Factor
  • Cleland Wildlife Park Volunteering Program
  • Physical education and gym
  • Art Therapy Program
  • Community Garden
  • Monarto Zoo Camp
  • Duke of Edinburgh’s Deep Creek Camp
  • Reclink Outdoor and Adventure Activities

All experiential learning activities can be linked to accreditation via Duke of Edinburgh’s Award or SACE Community Studies (Contract of Work).

Young person holding a skateboard.
Fees
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Enquiries + Referrals
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Related Services + Programs

GOM Central

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GOM Central

GOM Central is an online resource designed in collaboration with young people, helping to support young people in South Australia who are transitioning from care to independence.

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